gaksdesigns:

Food Miniatures by Shay Aaron

aardwolfpack:

Old news, but amazing.  As a child, Christopher Becker of Queensland, Australia found this interesting piece of brass in a bag of pipe fittings in a shed on his father’s farm.  He’d been hanging onto it for 36 years before learning it was a horary quadrant dating back to 1396.  The story is here, and the auction listing has more information.

The numbers stamped into the quadrant are part of the reason I find this interesting.  4, 5, and 7 look very strange.  Arabic numerals were just starting to be used in Europe at this point, and their shapes were not yet standardized.

wikihow:

Keep the Stars in Sight!

Make a Constellation Jar.

bigbardafree:

that’s definitely it

bigbardafree:

that’s definitely it

earthlycreations:

Lightning at Sunset by (Alan Montesanto)
“I have always held, too, that pistol practice should be distinctly an open-air pastime; and when Holmes, in one of his queer humors, would sit in an arm-chair with his hair-trigger and a hundred Boxer cartridges, and proceed to adorn the opposite wall with a patriotic V. R. done in bullet-pocks, I felt strongly that neither the atmosphere nor the appearance of our room was improved by it.”
The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual

(Source: and-it-is-always-1895)

reminder for bisexuals

lyricalred:

today is bi visibility day. as such, bisexual people will be completely visible for the next 24 hours. this is a bad day to engage in bank heists, ghost impersonations, covert operations for vague yet menacing government agencies, and other common bisexual hobbies that rely upon our powers of invisibility. 

reblog to save a life. 

zzazu:

this photo makes me feel like someone traveled to an alternate dimension and brought back something that shouldnt exist

zzazu:

this photo makes me feel like someone traveled to an alternate dimension and brought back something that shouldnt exist

(Source: vhsdreamz)

nyrbclassics:

The Pushcart War had a profound impact on me; when I was a kid I devoured it several times, and I’ve carried it deep inside me ever since. The book gave me a point of entrance—my first, I imagine—into the world of resistance to political and economic injustice and chicanery. It made opposition, even non-violent civil disobedience, seem fun and right and necessary and heroic, and something even someone as powerless as a kid could and should undertake.

—Tony Kushner

The New York Review Children’s Collection 50th Anniversary edition of Jean Merrill’s classic The Pushcart War,  illustrated by Ronni Solbert, hits bookstore shelves this week! 

questionabletastetheatre:

I have an article up at The Toast today! “I don’t think I’ll venture on dual garmenture”: Rational Dress and the Politics of Biking discusses pretty much what it says on the tin.

Research for this was delightful. Here are two of my favorite political cartoons and two of my favorite advertisements on the subject, at the far ends of the cultural response to Victorian biking costume: Terror that those ladies would go getting newfangled ideas in their heads…and how cool they would look if they did. (cartoons via, posters Wikimedia and Retrocatch)