gothiccharmschool:

artemis2apollo:

A Victorian Lady’s finishing touch—the chatelaine. (From Wikipedia)

A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. Each chain is mounted with a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.
Chatelaines were worn by many housekeepers in the 19th century and in the 16th century Dutch Republic,where they were typically used as watch chains for the most wealthy. Similar jewellery was also worn by Anglo Saxon women, as seen from the burial record, but its function is uncertain. The name chatelaine derives from the French term châtelaine

I want chatelaines to come back, and be useful and decorative for modern life. Bring back the tiny pens and notebooks! Create a smartphone holder! 

darknightneko:

gemiblu:

shopharajukubaby:

Bare Trees Gradient Turtleneck

$28

get on my body

here for $17

This week brought the news that Zappos, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Amazon, is going to occupy the unemployed for months with (mostly futile) attempts to become virtual “friends” with the online shoe retailer. As the Wall Street Journal reports:

Zappos, based in Las Vegas, plans to hire at least 450 people this year, but candidates won’t find out about those jobs on LinkedIn.com, Monster.com or the company website. Instead, they will have to join a social network, called Zappos Insiders, where they will network with current employees and demonstrate their passion for the company—in some cases publicly—in hopes that recruiters will tap them when jobs come open.

A naïve reader might imagine that the traditional hiring process, where a company posts its openings and job seekers submit their cover letters and resumes, did plenty to serve the interests of our nation’s job creators. But Zappos’s “head of talent acquisition,” Michiael Bailen, told the Journal that traditional hiring “is too ‘transactional.’” Instead of reading about the qualifications of potential hires, “Recruiters instead will spend time pursuing candidates in the Insiders group with digital Q&As or contests, events that they will use to help gauge prospective hires’ cultural fit.”

Zappos has apparently decided it is no longer good enough to be a qualified hire who is interested in the job. An interested applicant must also spend unremunerated time pretending to engage in virtual social relationships with existing employees. The American economy has become so warped that it now appears reasonable to a subsidiary of a leading public company to require people who may never be hired to spent large amounts of time pretending to be friends with people with whom they may never work.

This represents the convergence of at least three disturbing trends in the current American economy: the long-term unemployment of large numbers of people and the consequent power given to any company which is hiring; the technology industry’s revival of old prejudices under catchy new names; and the way that technology increasingly erodes any sense that our work selves are merely a component of our lives, rather than the entirety of our existence.

(x)

Zappos… this is a serious misstep. Ugh. Ugh ugh ugh.

(via khealywu)

image

AMAZON! jazz hands

(via copperbadge)

Dammit, I was about to order white loafers off zappos for cosplay, but this is horrible so I guess I’ll find them somewhere else.

(Source: katherinestasaph)

“So raise a glass to teenage girls for their linguistic innovation. It expands our expressive vocabulary, giving us new words and modes of expression. Speakers may nostalgically look to a previous golden era of English, but the truth is that Shakespeare’s English is an abomination of Chaucer’s English, which is an abomination of Beowolf’s. Language is inherently unstable. It’s in a constant state of flux, made and remade—stretched, altered, broken down and rearranged—by its speakers every day. Rather than a sign of corruption and disorder, this is language in its full vitality—a living, evolving organism.”
hummusrevolutionaryfront:

'Just had my day brightened up. Big Caribbean army bloke in front of me on the DLR knitting. Old lady turns to him and says “I didn't know men could knit”. He turns to her and in his best Caribbean accent says “No ma'am, the only thing men can't do is have babies. And there's nothing women can't do.” '
DLR= Docklands Light Railway, London

hummusrevolutionaryfront:

'Just had my day brightened up. Big Caribbean army bloke in front of me on the DLR knitting. Old lady turns to him and says “I didn't know men could knit”. He turns to her and in his best Caribbean accent says “No ma'am, the only thing men can't do is have babies. And there's nothing women can't do.” '

DLR= Docklands Light Railway, London

wickedclothes:

Planetary Plates

Make sure your next meal is out of this world. This plate set features eight plates, each resembling a planet in our solar system. Ten inches in diameter and dishwasher safe. Sold on ThinkGeek.

(Source: wickedclothes)

What was it like to be a female Star Trek fan in the 1960s?

magnoliapearl:

seiya234:

phene-thyla-mine:

I found these reddit posts that I thought gave great insight into what it was like for women in the 1960s who enjoyed Star Trek.  Very eye-opening, in my opinion.  I hadn’t realized the extent to which women enjoying science fiction was frowned upon.  Source: X

[–]Aynielle 6 points 11 months ago:  I often wonder if our mothers pined away for members of the og star trek crew like this? William Shatner was a fine man, back in his day. http://www.culch.ie/images/Shatner001.jpg

[–]thecla 8 points 11 months ago:  Yes, we did. And we wrote fanfic, though there was no internet to share it on.

[–]Aynielle 2 points 11 months ago:  Was it just passed amongst friends? Or were there publications that featured them? Thanks for posting! I find this wildly interesting. :)

[–]thecla 5 points 11 months ago:  Ok, if you don’t mind a bit of a story…

I went to a private girls’ high school in the mid-late 60’s. I was already a geek, though that wasn’t a term we used. Anyway, I’d already watched the first season of ST by the time I got to school, and was freaking out a bit, ‘cause the dorms had only one TV per dorm; each dorm had about a hundred girls in it.

Star Trek was on Friday nights, so I figured there was no way I’d ever get to see it (it was not as popular at first as everyone seems to say it was). I found out, though, that the first person to sit by the TV after dinner got to say what would be watched! It wasn’t really as much of a race as you’d think, because before Star Trek came on, there was Wild, Wild West, and Robert Conrad with those very, very tight pants (Conrad)Everyone watched that! Actually, it wasn’t till I showed up that anyone bothered leaving the TV on after that.

I watched Star Trek alone for the first couple weeks, then a couple girls stayed with me, then more, and soon it was everybody settling in for two hours of quality coughcough TV.

By sophomore year we had it down to a science: who would make the popcorn, who would bring the drinks, and we would sit there with our hair wrapped around juice cans and coffee cans to get just the right amount of straight vs. curl, in our robes and bunny slippers to watch the best looking guys on TV run around, hopefully without shirts on.

Sophomore year brought us an additional student who was really good at writing. She could write phenomenal satires on whatever literature we were reading, and could translate them into Latin or Greek while she was doing it. Her stories always got passed around (remember, no computers, she wrote them out longhand, then typed them with two sheets of paper and a carbon in between. Some of the stories were a hundred pages or more.)

This girl did a full-length take-off on The Rape of The Lock by John Donne, (which is already a satire) that had us all in stitches, ended up being read by the staff (and it was about them…). We could hear the teachers laughing from rooms away!

Anyway, this is the girl that started writing the Star Trek fanfic. She wrote one for herself and asked me to proofread it (we were roommates), and I begged and begged for one about me till she finally gave in and wrote it. Then another girl found out, and another, and then someone else started writing them. And yes, they would make the rounds, so everybody got to read them all. All written longhand, then typed, collated, stapled, and hopefully treasured by the recipient. I wonder sometimes how many of them still exist.

By the way, when I was at home (school in New York State, home in the Chicago area), I never met another girl who watched Star Trek. Science Fiction was so frowned upon as reading material or watching material for girls, you have no idea. My parents were very upset when they caught me reading my brother’s copies of Asimov, or Clarke. Yeah, I had to hide them under the mattress during the day and read under the covers with a flashlight at night. Even at college, it was rare for me to find another girl who liked science fiction.

Respect your fandom foremothers.

THIS IS FUCKING CUUUUUTE

feminismandpugsarelife:

All I hear when men start shit talking selfie culture is, “Don’t give women any opportunities to believe they are beautiful and important; they might start believing it.”

"You should have better self-esteem! … God, no, we didn’t mean you should actually think you’re pretty, sheesh. You’re supposed to think you’re ugly so that we can kindly reassure you that you’re not! Duh."